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A jury convicted a Manchester, New Hampshire man of drug trafficking this week. Police came to the man’s house after he was shot during a home invasion. When police asked to search the premises, the man refused. Police obtained a search warrant and found 5.5 ounces of crack cocaine, as well as $600 cash in a safe within the home.

The man represented himself in court, remarking in his opening statement to the jury that the police would not be able to prove that he possessed any drugs. Ultimately, that same jury convicted the man on the charge of trafficking crack cocaine. Due to the fact that he has prior possession charges, the man could face a maximum penalty of life in prison.drug1

Drug Possession in New Hampshire

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Just as the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has developed a DWI Detection Process for motor vehicles, they have also created specific guidelines in the “Detection of DWI Motorcyclists.” The creation of this guide came in response to law enforcement officers believing it to be impossible to distinguish between impaired and unimpaired motorcyclists. NHSTA researchers analyzed over 1000 motorcyclist DWI arrest reports and interviewed law enforcement personnel in order to compile a list of 100 cues that had already been used by officers in the identification of impaired motorcyclists.motorcycle-dui-e-300x200

The NHTSA conducted two field studies on 50 different sites throughout the United States and the compilation of the results allowed researchers to highlight the most effective cues available and as a result produced the “Motorcycle DWI Detection” Guide. Out of the 100 cues compiled by NHTSA, 14 cues have a higher probability to discriminate between impaired or unimpaired motorcycle operation.

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DWI/DUI detection procedures are set forth by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and documented in the NHTSA “DWI Detection and Standardized Field Sobriety Testing (SFST)” Participant Manual. When talking about a DWI/DUI in New Hampshire, the acronym DWI means “driving while impaired” and is synonymous with DUI, “driving under the influence.”

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Pedestrian accidents can be among the most severe types of personal injuries that you can suffer. Getting hit by a car -– even a car that was only traveling very slowly -– can lead to significant injuries because pedestrians are utterly without protection and cars are massive. Even the smallest vehicle on the roads today can weigh more than 2,500 pounds, while bigger ones like SUVs can be as heavy as 7,000. The force of all of this weight makes getting hit by one of these vehicles rarely a trivial affair.pedrestian-accident-lawyer-300x127

Getting compensated for the injuries that you suffer in a pedestrian accident is crucial to ensure you make a full recovery and get back on your feet. The personal injury attorneys at the Manchester, New Hampshire office of Tenn And Tenn, PA can help.

Pedestrian Accidents Happen Constantly

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Two people in Manchester are facing serious criminal charges after police searched their home and found large amounts of drugs and cash. While the details are sketchy at this point, the search seems to have been initiated after the couple’s 2-year-old son was hospitalized after being found unresponsive on their couch.search-300x109

The incident highlights how quickly police can invade your right to privacy.

Couple Faces Drug Charges

The terrible situation began on Friday, May 25, 2018, when the parents of a 2-year-old child found him unresponsive on a couch in their Manchester, New Hampshire home. They rushed the boy to the Catholic Medical Center, where they told the staff that the child might have eaten dry wall from a small plastic bag in their home.

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New Hampshire’s attempt to cut down on distracted driving car accidents led to the passage of a “hands-free” law that prohibits using any hand-held device while driving. These include cellphones, GPS devices, and tablets.handheldAR-150629933-300x194

The law, codified at N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 265:79-c, went into effect in July 2015, and made New Hampshire the 15th state to have one. Violating it came with a $100 fine for a first offense. The fine increased to $250 fine for a second offense within 24 months, and then a $500 fine for a third offense.

But has the law worked? The results are inconclusive.

Police: Steep Decline in Fatal Crashes Due to Hands-Free Law

According to the police, the law is working wonders on the roads of our state. In an interview with New Hampshire Public Radio, Matt Shapiro, a major in the New Hampshire State Police, claimed that there was “clear evidence” that the law was working.

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Two people suffered serious but non-life-threatening injuries when they were involved in a car accident with a moose. The incident highlights how dangerous a crash with a wild animal can be.Moose-Crossing-300x199

Car Hits Moose: Two Hurt

The incident happened on May 26, 2018, in Campton, New Hampshire.

The driver and a passenger of a Mini Cooper were traveling northbound on Interstate 93 when a moose appeared in front of them on the roadway. The driver was not able to avoid hitting the moose head-on, and ended up driving into the trees on the side of the highway after the collision.

While the driver was able to walk away from the crash, the passenger was trapped inside the vehicle. People who stopped to help after the crash were able to pry the roof far enough to get the passenger out of the car.

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Students who are newly graduated from schools and universities in New Hampshire and who are intent on continuing their studies in graduate schools can face additional obstacles in their future if they have a criminal conviction on their record. Even if this blemish was not serious, and even if it happened years ago, it can impact your ability to gain admission into the graduate program of your dreams. Even if you do get in, a criminal background can prevent you from getting the financial aid that you need.criminalrecord-1

These are just one more example of the collateral consequences of a criminal conviction.

The Collateral Consequences of a Criminal Conviction

Contrary to popular belief, if you get convicted of a crime, the penalties that you will face go beyond just the fines, jail time, and probation that the state will put you through. Once those are all finished, there are still the informal penalties and the social stigmas that individual people and companies will impose on you.

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The month of May is frequently the first of the year that is warm enough for motorcycles to be out on the roads of New Hampshire on a regular basis. After being hidden in garages all winter, the sudden presence of motorcycles on the roads can come as a surprise. This can make it helpful for motorcyclists and car drivers to review some of the safety tips that can prevent a motorcycle accident. motorcycleawarenessad-300x158

Motorcyclists: Wear a Helmet

Motorcyclists are probably tired of hearing this safety tip. They are probably sick of hearing estimates by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) that say helmets saved the lives of 1,772 bikers in 2015 alone.

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To all new college graduates in New Hampshire, congratulations! But now that you are out of school, it is only a matter of time before you realize that the working world is a far less forgiving place than a university. One example is how many jobs require their workers to carry professional licenses or security clearances. Getting these certifications, however, can be impossible if you have a criminal record.

This is just another example of the collateral consequences of a criminal conviction.college-graduate-living-at-home-300x200

Collateral Consequences of a Conviction

When people think of the penalties they can face after being convicted of a crime, they think of fines, possible jail time, probation, and mandatory community service.

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