Articles Tagged with New Hampshire personal injury

Published on:

A car accident can happen to anyone anywhere, and it will often take a person completely by surprise and leave him or her reeling in shock, especially if injuries were sustained. Maybe you were out with your family driving along any one of our Granite State’s scenic highways, or maybe you were just running a quick errand to the store. Being in a car accident can irrevocably change your life in a matter of a few seconds.

Continue reading →

Published on:

Tenn-Comparitive-fault-300x219In July 2021, a four-vehicle collision (including a semi-trailer truck) shut down several lanes of traffic on I-93 in New Hampshire. Fortunately, none of the injuries were life-threatening, but the accident itself is an object lesson in the complexities of figuring out percentages of fault under New Hampshire’s tort laws. Multiple personal Continue reading →

Published on:

Tenn-car-safety-features-300x204As our cars’ safety and technological features increase in complexity every year, you may be concerned about how safe they are. It’s difficult to give up control of your speed, braking, and lane changes to a machine. We’re so trained to actively drive our cars that it can be disconcerting when your steering wheel thinks you’re trying to change lanes without signaling when you’re really passing through a construction zone with old, faded lane lines crossing through your path. At least three people have already died in driverless car crashes. As our automotive future “steers” us towards driverless cars, should we be concerned? And what happens when our car safety features don’t work the way they should?

Continue reading →

Published on:

Tenn-motorcycle-accident-300x236If you’re a New Hampshire motorcyclist, you’re likely aware of just how dangerous and scary a motorcycle accident can be. According to the Insurance Information Institute, even skilled, defensive motorcyclists are at heightened risk of crashes—for several reasons.

They’re open vehicles. They’re smaller and less visible to other motorists on the road. They require a different and more precise mental and physical skill-set than other vehicles. Motorcyclists also tend to exhibit a higher vulnerability to adverse road conditions and poor weather than people in closed vehicles.

Continue reading →

Published on:

Tenn-Slow-driving-300x275When we think of dangerous driving, our minds often go to fast cars zipping in and out of traffic, threatening the safety of everyone around them. While it’s true that the need for speed can indeed be hazardous, driving too slowly can be just as perilous.

Why People Drive Too Slowly

Distractions are one of the leading causes of slow driving. As humans, we like to think of ourselves as excellent multitaskers, able to drive and check our texts or emails at the same time. In Continue reading →

Published on:

Tenn-road-debris-300x218New Hampshire is known for its beautiful scenery, filled with mountains, lakes, fall foliage, and more. Along with that beauty comes the risk of natural debris. Last summer, a New Hampshire woman died after crashing into trees. In April 2021, a New Hampshire woman hit a tree on a Vermont road and died. A fire ensued mid-May 2021 after a driver hit a deer on Rt 118 in Dorchester.

Continue reading →

Published on:

Tenn-accidents-during-pandemic-215x300In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, mandatory lockdowns resulted in many companies moving to remote work, resulting in fewer cars on the road. For months, highways and roads that had been stop-and-go during rush hour were now open and empty. With the decrease in activity, one would expect a decrease in automobile accidents. In fact, the opposite was true.

A National Safety Council report found that an estimated 42,060 individuals died in auto accidents during 2020—this represents an increase of 8% compared to 2019. Eight states had an increase of more than 17% (ranging from 18% to 33%) in the number of estimated deaths due to car crashes. Examined through another lens, if you compare national “traffic deaths to the number of miles driven, the rate of fatalities rose 24%.”

Continue reading →

Published on:

Tenn-Motorcycle-injury-page-300x179While New Hampshire motorcycle enthusiasts may reap the benefits of enjoying the open road, there are definite dangers that affect motorcycles more than others. Being a motorcyclist is risky. It doesn’t help that the type of injuries that even a skilled, defensive motorcyclist can sustain tend to cause a disproportionate amount of damage, pain, and suffering compared to closed-vehicle accidents.

According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, in 2018, the number of motorcyclist (or motorcycle passenger) deaths was almost 27 times the number of deaths in cars per mile traveled. This is partially because the Continue reading →

Published on:

New Hampshire—home of Mount Washington, which is known for its erratic weather—receives heavy amounts of snowfall, rain, and ice every year. On average, precipitation occurs 133 days per year. The average rainfall is 46 inches of rain (compared to the US average of 38 inches) and 68 inches of snow (28 inches for the US). And precipitation is not the only concern. Mount Washington, located in the Presidential Range of the White Mountains in Coös County, has recorded wind speeds of 231 mph (which held the worldwide record from 1933 to 1996). Although the rest of the state does not necessarily experience such extreme winds, the overall weather does present some unique concerns.Tenn-New-Hampshire-weather-300x228 Continue reading →

Published on:

Since the world began tracking COVID-19 cases, there have been nearly 168 million cases worldwide and more than 33 million cases in the United States. Although the long-term consequences of COVID-19 infection are still unfolding, some of the effects came into play as early as last summer, when experts predicted that as many as 1 in 3 patients could experience neurological after-effects of the disease.

Neurological Impact

Tenn-slip-300x295
Beyond lung damage, this is perhaps the most concerning long-term effect. Although scientists are undecided on whether COVID-19 attacks the brain itself, the evidence clearly points to the ongoing potential results: increased fatigue, sleep disorders, gait challenges, loss of vision, and tingling/numbness in limbs. And, the prediction from last August has proven to be prescient and accurate by several longitudinal studies. “The survivors displayed a wide array of neurological symptoms: fatigue, from memory and attention issues to sleep disorders, myalgias followed by depression/anxiety, visual disturbances, tremors, and anosmia, the loss of the sense of smell.”

Contact Information