Articles Tagged with new hampshire motorcycle accident

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A motorcycle rider in Alton lost control of his motorcycle recently and crashed, according to a news report from WMUR. He was traveling down Route 28 on a weekday afternoon when his motorcycle crashed into a roadside ditch. Rescue workers extracted the motorcyclist from the ditch and he was transferred by helicopter to Lebanon’s Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, where he is being treated for serious injuries. Local police are attempting to determine what caused the motorcycle to crash. According to police, the crash marks the first motorcycle accident that has occurred in Alton this year.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) dozens of New Hampshire motorcyclists lose their lives in motorcycle crashes each year. While the number of fatal New Hampshire motorcycle accidents has stayed low in most recent years, 2005 was a particularly dangerous year in which 41 motorcyclists fatalities occurred. In addition, dozens of motorcycle riders suffer injuries on New Hampshire roads each year when they are involved in traffic accidents.

If you have been injured in a motorcycle accident, you have certain rights under New Hampshire law. One of these rights gives you the chance to seek compensation from the negligent motorist who was responsible for the accident and your injuries. To learn more about your legal rights and to discuss your case with an experienced New Hampshire motorcycle accident attorney, please don’t hesitate to contact Tenn And Tenn, P.A. today. Call 1-888-511-1010 for a free and confidential telephone consultation.

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A Manchester resident was seriously injured in a New Hampshire motorcycle crash recently, according to an article published in the Union-Leader. He was traveling at a high rate of speed when he crashed at the corner of Laxon Avenue and Eduardo Street. It appears he was trying to elude police officers when he crashed.

Officers appeared at the scene almost immediately after the motorcycle driver crashed and called emergency services, which transported the man to a local hospital to receive treatment for the serious injuries sustained in the New Hampshire motorcycle accident. Police officers reported that speed was a factor in the crash, but did not say whether intoxication or road conditions played a role in the motorcycle accident.

Traveling in urban areas at high speeds is never safe, and it is especially dangerous for motorcyclists. Motorcycle riders are less protected than motorists in cars. Motorcycle riders can help protect themselves from accidents by obeying posted speed limits. Drivers of cars and trucks can also help prevent serious motor vehicle collisions by following speed limits and by staying a safe distance away from motorcycle riders. This will allow a vehicle the distance it needs to stop in time if the motorcyclist should fall or crash.

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A recent article about a proposed ban on so-called “high-risk motorcycles” in Quebec raises interesting questions about whether the United States would ever follow suit. Apparently, Quebec is looking to follow a French system which classifies motorcycles in seven tiers, taking age and experience into account. The proposed switch in system is supported by motorcycle accident statistics that show that so-called “high-performance” motorcycles are up to eight times more likely to crash than cars on the road.

Though the likelihood of the United States ever adopting such a system seems slim to none, it is interesting to consider the dangers of varying degrees of motorcycle speed and power. According to the Quebec insurance agency, “high-risk” motorcycles include those which feature low, short handlebars, oversized frames, and streamlined designs that emphasize a crouched driving position. These include bikes by BMW, Ducati, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha, among others. These bikes are designed for performance and speed and usually operate at far higher CCs than other bikes.

Unfortunately, motorcycle accidents occur on bikes of all calibers. Take the case of a Tenn

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A recent op-ed article in the American Spectator criticizes motorcyclists for driving “impractical conveyances” and disrupting drivers on the road with their rumbling tailpipes. But though the article, written by Henry Gekonde, is for the most part an innocuous reflection on the popularity of motorcycling in New Hampshire, it misses its point at the very end.

“Still, the bikers can’t wait, and they’ve already brought out their machines, and they’re big and loud. ‘MOTORCYCLES ARE EVERYWHERE,’ says a bumper sticker on an SUV. It’s not a warning; it’s a deliberate provocation,” says Gekonde.

Unfortunately, this misconception is one that can hurt motorcyclists.

Published on:

A recent article about a proposed ban on so-called “high-risk motorcycles” in Quebec raises interesting questions about whether the United States would ever follow suit. Apparently, Quebec is looking to follow a French system which classifies motorcycles in seven tiers, taking age and experience into account. The proposed switch in system is supported by motorcycle accident statistics that show that so-called “high-performance” motorcycles are up to eight times more likely to crash than cars on the road.

Though the likelihood of the United States ever adopting such a system seems slim to none, it is interesting to consider the dangers of varying degrees of motorcycle speed and power. According to the Quebec insurance agency, “high-risk” motorcycles include those which feature low, short handlebars, oversized frames, and streamlined designs that emphasize a crouched driving position. These include bikes by BMW, Ducati, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha, among others. These bikes are designed for performance and speed and usually operate at far higher CCs than other bikes.

Unfortunately, motorcycle accidents occur on bikes of all calibers. Take the case of a Tenn