Articles Tagged with New Hampshire DUI

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New Hampshire police officers are trained to observe other drivers on the road for signs that motorists are operating while under the influence of alcohol (DUI) or while intoxicated (DWI). One of the main indications that police officers look for is a driver’s inability to use “divided attention” skills.

The phrase “divided attention” simply describes the ability to do more than one task at a time. Drivers have to be able to pay attention to many things at once, such as the speed of the vehicle, the distance between their car and the one in front of them, the presence of any hazards such as barriers or pedestrians, and the directions given by street signs and traffic signals.

Alcohol consumption can make dividing attention more difficult. Intoxicated drivers will often focus on only one thing on the road and ignore all the others, no matter how important they are. For instance, an intoxicated driver may focus on the taillights of the car ahead and forget to notice or respond to a changing traffic light.

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As of February 2011, the federal Research of Alcohol Detection Systems for Stopping Alcohol-Related Fatalities Everywhere Act, which is also referred to as the ROADS SAFE Act, is still just a bill sitting in the U.S. Senate. If passed, however, the Act could have a significant effect on drunk driving nationwide.

The ROADS SAFE Act offers the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) an additional $6 million in federal funding for the next five years to research ways to use technology to prevent drivers from operating their vehicles when under the influence of alcohol. The bill’s sponsors, Senator Tom Udall (D-NM) and Senator Bob Corker (R-TN), are especially interested in finding technology that is cheap, reliably detects a drier’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent or more, and doesn’t impair a sober driver’s ability to drive a car outfitted with the technology.

The NHTSA would use the additional funding to conduct studies and research of technologies that can help prevent drunk driving, such as in-car detection systems that read whether the driver’s BAC is above the legal limit of 0.08 percent. The money may be used by the NHTSA’s own researchers, or it may be distributed as grants to private researchers to help create and distribute alcohol detection systems. Several interest groups support the bill, including the Distilled Spirits Council and Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD).

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Research in Motion (RIM), a company that creates applications for use on Blackberry smartphones, recently agreed to drop its app that allowed people to search for DUI checkpoints and other road hazards, according to an article in PC World magazine. RIM agreed to make the change after several U.S. senators, including Harry Reid, Chuck Schumer, Frank Lautenberg, and Mark Udall, asked the company to drop the app, which they believe give an unfair advantage to drunk drivers.

The application, known as “PhantomALERT,” provided information on local “speed traps, red light cameras, speed cameras, school zones, DUI checkpoints, and dangerous intersections,” according to PC World. The app was sold online through Blackberry App World. Three similar programs for Apple’s iPhone have also been removed from Apple’s store. Two of the Apple apps were specific to Los Angeles and Orange County, California, but the third provided information on DUI checkpoints and other points along roads within a 100-mile radius of the user.

Although the apps have non-DUI-related uses, such as helping drivers avoid dangerous intersections or traffic backups, the senators who requested these apps be removed were primarily concerned that drivers might use them to evade the law. However, knowing where New Hampshire DUI checkpoints are is no guarantee that a driver will not be stopped by police, whether the drivers is drunk or sober.

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The holidays mean festivities and fun, which often involves alcohol for some individuals. Unfortunately, as the number of parties you attend increases, so does your risk of being charged with driving under the influence (DUI) or driving while intoxicated (DWI), according to a recent article published by New Hampshire news outlet WMUR.

Holiday parties provide a host of occasions to have a drink this time of year. The hazards posed by snow and ice plus more nighttime driving due to short days make a New Hampshire car accident even more likely. Combine these dangerous driving conditions with one too many drinks, and a criminal charge may result.

In order to prevent a New Hampshire DUI charge from ruining your holiday season, consider taking safety measures such as choosing a designated driver who will not drink, taking a cab or a bus to and from parties, or hosting the party yourself so that you do not have to drive. If you are a party host, ask your friends to choose a designated driver or take public transportation, and offer plenty of non-alcoholic beverages and food so your guests can have fun and stay safe. Also, remember that you can be charged with DUI if you are driving a snowmobile or ATV.

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Police have charged a Claremont driver with driving under the influence (DUI) and texting while driving after her car ran off the road onto the side of I-89, according to a release by New Hampshire news affiliate WMUR. No one was hurt in the accident.

The driver was traveling north on I-89 when her car grazed a guardrail and a few trees before coming to a stop. The woman was allegedly sending a text on her cell phone at the time, and police cited her for texting while driving, which is prohibited under New Hampshire law. Police did not say what prompted them to arrest her for driving under the influence of alcohol, but did say that her lack of attention to the road, caused by her texting, likely caused the New Hampshire car accident.

In New Hampshire, even if your blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is under the legal limit of 0.08, you may still be charged with a DUI if you have any alcohol or drugs in your system that impair your ability to drive safely. Many things can distract a motorist on the road. To maximize your safety, it is best to minimize all distractions, including using a handheld device such as a cell phone or mp3 player.

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In New Hampshire, the Division of Motor Vehicles will suspend your drivers’ license in certain DUI or DWI-related situations. This can occur even if you have not yet been convicted of a New Hampshire DUI or DWI charge. This suspension is known as an Administrative License Suspension, or ALS.

Currently, you will face an administrative license suspension in New Hampshire if you refuse to take a chemical test to analyze your blood alcohol concentration (BAC); if your BAC upon testing is revealed to be 0.08 or higher; or if you are under age 21 and your BAC is 0.02 or above. A different, harsher set of rules applies to drivers who have commercial drivers’ licenses (CDLs).

When putting an ALS on a New Hampshire driver’s license, the Division of Motor Vehicles must give notice to the driver that their license is revoked. The suspension generally begins thirty days after the driver is notified. When the notice is delivered, the driver receives a temporary license good for the 30-day period between the notice and when the suspension begins.

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A preliminary breath test (PBT) is a small handheld breath testing device used by police officers to determine whether or not to arrest a person for DUI. In New Hampshire, the PBT used is the Intoxilyzer S-D5. Typically, the PBT is administered following field sobriety tests. Based upon a motorist’s performance of field sobriety tests and the results of the PBT, a police officer makes a determination to arrest or release the driver.

This preliminary breath testing device employs fuel cell technology that is not specific for ethyl alcohol. Some foods, medication and even non-alcoholic drinks may contain traces of alcohol which may produce a positive reading on the PBT. Moreover, the PBT cannot be adjusted for a person’s actual blood-to-breath ratio, body temperature, or gender. In addition, it does not have a “slope detector” to rule out errors caused by mouth alcohol and other interferents. And, when the AA batteries run low, results may vary. Despite its shortcoming, failure rate and inherent errors, the PBT, it is used by police as a “screening” device when making their DUI arrest decisions.

If you or a loved one is being charged with a DUI crime, do not hesitate to contact the experienced New Hampshire DUI defense attorneys at Tenn And Tenn, P.A. Our lawyers will examine the circumstances surrounding your DUI and will provide you the strongest defense possible. Please call us today for a free consultation at 1-888-511-1010.

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New Hampshire’s DUI Mobile Command Unit is advertised as a great aid in the fight against drunk driving. The Command Unit includes blood-testing and fingerprinting machines, holding cells for individuals found to have been driving under the influence, and even room for a bail bondsman. The Command Unit is designed to quickly process alleged drunk drivers at sobriety checkpoints.

The $500,000 DUI Mobile Command Unit was made possible by funding from the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration, with the price of gasoline being the only operating cost that local law enforcement agencies are responsible for. The Mobile Command Unit is under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Liquor Enforcement. The Mobile Unit’s purpose is threefold: to promote public safety, to protect public health, and to generate revenue that will further help curb drunk driving.

In addition to helping remove impaired drivers from the road, the DUI Mobile Command Unit is also used to present educational programs throughout the state, warning of the dangers of drunk driving. According to the coordinator of the New Hampshire Highway Safety Agency, driving under the influence “is without a doubt the worst problem we have on our highways. Thirty percent of all fatalities on our highways are related to drunk driving.”

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According to a recent article from MSN.com’s “Money” section, driving under the influence is more expensive than one would ever imagine. Aside from New Hampshire DUI fines and bail costs, there are a variety of other factors that should be taken into consideration before you get behind the wheel of an automobile while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. And keep in mind that these fees exclude damages that would need to be paid in the event that property damage or injury to another person is involved.

MSN points to different fees that can add up to exorbitant amounts in the blink of an eye.

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