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Articles Tagged with bac new hampshire

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Police have charged a Claremont driver with driving under the influence (DUI) and texting while driving after her car ran off the road onto the side of I-89, according to a release by New Hampshire news affiliate WMUR. No one was hurt in the accident.

The driver was traveling north on I-89 when her car grazed a guardrail and a few trees before coming to a stop. The woman was allegedly sending a text on her cell phone at the time, and police cited her for texting while driving, which is prohibited under New Hampshire law. Police did not say what prompted them to arrest her for driving under the influence of alcohol, but did say that her lack of attention to the road, caused by her texting, likely caused the New Hampshire car accident.

In New Hampshire, even if your blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is under the legal limit of 0.08, you may still be charged with a DUI if you have any alcohol or drugs in your system that impair your ability to drive safely. Many things can distract a motorist on the road. To maximize your safety, it is best to minimize all distractions, including using a handheld device such as a cell phone or mp3 player.

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As the Union Leader recently reported, New Hampshire’s former Liquor Commissioner was recently convicted of driving while intoxicated (DWI), resulting in $620 in fines and a suspended license. But the former Commissioner’s troubles began not with his conviction, but with the DWI charge.

After the former commissioner was arrested for DWI in April, Governor John Lynch fired him, citing the arrest as the cause. Although the governor noted that those who are arrested on suspicion of a crime should be considered innocent until proven guilty, he said that the former liquor commissioner’s behavior was “simply unacceptable.”

The governor was particularly troubled by the former Commissioner’s unwillingness to submit to a breath test to determine his blood alcohol content (BAC) on the night of his arrest. New Hampshire law holds that anyone who receives a New Hampshire drivers’ license has given “implied consent” to law enforcement to obtain a breath or blood sample for testing when the driver is suspected of being under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

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