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Articles Posted in NH DUI Lawyers

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If you’ve been arrested and charged with DWI, one of the biggest dilemmas you will likely face is whether to tell your employer about it–and if so, what you should say. Are you required to tell your boss about the DWI? Could you lose your job over it? The answers to these questions may depend on your situation and circumstances, so let’s dive a bit deeper.

When Are You Required to Disclose a DWI to Your Employer?Tenn-boss-249x300

To be clear, there is no law on the books that explicitly requires you to report a DWI to your current employer—and in fact, the law places some limits on what an employer may ask about your criminal record. However, there are a few exceptions in which you must disclose a DWI to your boss. For example:

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If you are arrested and convicted one time for DWI, it could be attributed to a misunderstanding or a lapse in judgment. If you’re arrested for repeated DWIs, it signals a possible problem. If you find yourself caught in a repeated DWI cycle, you’re not alone–but you’re still in a dangerous position. As many as one-third of all DWI arrests are for repeat offenders, and according to MADD, 91 percent of alcohol-related fatalities are committed by repeat offenders.

If you have multiple DWIs, you’re at risk for a host of consequences, including unemployment, loss of driving privileges, higher insurance rates, and jail time–not to mention an increased chance of causing injury or death to yourself and others. The best way to break this cycle is to understand its root causes and then take tangible steps to disrupt the cycle.

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Why People Commit Repeat DWIs

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So you’re facing your third (or fourth) DWI arrest. Here in New Hampshire, that means you’re now dealing with felony charges. If convicted, you’re facing mandatory jail time, plus an indefinite suspension of your driver’s license. But beyond these challenges, you’re now wondering if something is wrong with you. Do you have a problem with alcoholism? Perhaps you’re even wondering if you were born with a propensity for DWI. Is it true? Are you somehow genetically fated to have problems with alcoholism resulting in continued DWIs?

While there certainly is a possibility that your propensity for alcohol is genetic, that does not mean you’re doomed to fight DWIs all your life. Let’s explore this question a bit further.

The Connection Between Alcoholism and GeneticsTenn-DNA-300x213

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If you’ve ever had a DWI, you know you don’t want another one. A second offense in New Hampshire means losing your license for three full years, and a third offense means losing it indefinitely. Luckily, as the saying goes, there’s an app for that. In fact, there are several iOS and Android apps designed to keep you from getting behind the wheel when you’ve had a few too many.

BAC CalculatorsTenn-phone-apps-229x300

The simplest sort of app for drinkers is the blood alcohol content (BAC) calculator. These programs do just what they promise: they calculate your blood alcohol content and let you know if it’s safe for you to drive. Most of them ask you to provide physical details—height, weight, gender, age—and a list of what you consume over the course of an evening. It’s only an estimate, but these apps can give you a sense of how much alcohol is in your system at any given moment. Some even have an element of fun to them. EndDUI includes several games which test your ability to focus.

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