Articles Posted in Family Law

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Mary Elizabeth Tenn, a Manchester trial lawyer, takes office as president of the New Hampshire Bar Association on June 19, 2015 at the Bar Association’s Annual Meeting. As president of the Association, which represents all lawyers licensed to practice law in the state, Tenn said she intends to focus the culture of professionalism and civility that characterizes the practice of law in the state.

Mary Tenn takes office as President of the NH Bar Assoc.

Mary Tenn takes office as President of the NH Bar Assoc.

Tenn, a New Hampshire native, practices with the law firm of Tenn And Tenn, PA along with her three siblings James J. Tenn, Jr., John J. Tenn and Annmarie A. Tenn. Notably, Tenn is the second person in her family and in her firm to serve as president of the NH Bar Association, and follows her brother James J. Tenn, Jr. a past president of the New Hampshire Bar Association in 2009-2010. This year, Tenn And Tenn, PA, marks its 20th year of existence.

Tenn received her J.D. degree, cum laude, from Harvard Law School, where she served as an editor of the Harvard Civil Rights Civil Liberties Law Review. She received a B.A., summa cum laude, from Boston College, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and awarded membership in the National Jesuit Honor Society—The Order of the Cross and Crown.

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Tenn And Tenn, P.A. is Listed Among the Best Lawyers in New Hampshire- 2014

Tenn And Tenn, P.A. is pleased to announce that New Hampshire Magazine has recognized three members of the firm among the Best Lawyers of New Hampshire for 2014. Partners James J. Tenn Jr., John J. Tenn, and Mary E. Tenn have been named among NH’s Best Lawyers.  Jim and Mary have been selected as Best Lawyers in the area of Family Law, and Jim has also been selected as a Best Lawyer in the area of Family Law Mediation.  John and Jim have been selected as Best Lawyers in the area of Personal Injury Litigation on behalf of injured plaintiffs.  bestlawyersheader

The Best Lawyers in America is one of the most respected peer-review publications in the legal profession.  Since it was first published in 1983, Best Lawyers® has become universally regarded as the definitive guide to legal excellence. Best Lawyers is based on an exhaustive peer-review survey to identify the country’s top attorneys.  Over 52,000 leading attorneys cast more than 5.5 million votes on the legal abilities of other lawyers in their practice areas. Lawyers are not required or allowed to pay a fee to be listed; therefore inclusion in Best Lawyers is considered a singular honor.

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Believe it or not, what you post on Facebook is likely to stay online forever and what you post today can have an effect on you years down the road. The ubiquitous nature of social media has made it an unrivaled source of evidence that can be used against you in a criminal case. If you have been arrested for a crime and the postings on your social media sites are relevant to your alleged criminal activity, it can be brought up in a court case. and may assist the prosecution in obtaining a conviction. It would be wise to speak to an experienced criminal lawyer who is familiar with the laws on social media data and electronically stored information (ESI).  Facebook

A judge or a jury only has to take one look at damaging photos or post that you willingly made on Facebook to determine what kind of person they think you are. Even if this isn’t your everyday normal behavior, just one photo of you doing something unethical can land you in hot water. So why take the chance when it comes to posting negative things on the largest social network in the world?

 

Big brother just might be watching you.

 Doing something illegal and then posting a picture of the crime on Facebook is a sure way to land you in jail. Local authorities are getting wise to looking at the Internet and Facebook for subjective behavior. These agencies along with state and federal authorities often monitor Facebook, for acts of crime caught in a screen shot or a picture. Continue reading →

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The family-owned law firm of Tenn And Tenn, P.A. is growing with the addition of its newest attorney, Annmarie A. Tenn.  Tenn joins her siblings in one of the area’s top-ranked law firms and focuses her practice on business disputes, personal injury, and marital cases. Annmarie Tenn

Tenn And Tenn, P.A. has long been a family law firm  comprised of three attorneys – James Tenn, Jr., John Tenn, and Mary Elizabeth Tenn. “We’re thrilled to be expanding our family business,” said John Tenn, who is one of the firm’s founders. “We work hard to serve our clients and to help them achieve great results. Annmarie continues those efforts.”

Tenn is quick to emphasize that Annmarie joins the firm with top-notch experience. Annmarie graduated from Harvard Law School in 2003, where she served as the co-Editor-in-Chief of the Harvard Women’s Law Journal.  She  served as a law clerk to the former Chief Justice of the New Hampshire Supreme Court. Annmarie also spent the better part of a decade working her way to a senior position in the litigation department of Ropes & Gray LLP in Boston, Massachusetts, a premier national law firm.

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ATTORNEYS JIM, JOHN AND MARY TENN NAMED IN THE BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICA, 2013

Tenn And Tenn, P.A. is proud to announce that Jim, John and Mary Tenn were recently selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America® 2013 (Copyright 2012 by Woodward/White, Inc., of Aiken, SC).  Jim Tenn was recognized for his work in Family Law, Family Law Mediation and Personal Injury. John Tenn was honored for his work in Personal Injury-Plaintiff. And, Mary Tenn was selected for her work in Family Law in New Hampshire.

For three decades, Best Lawyers has been regarded by both the legal profession and the public, as the definitive guide to legal excellence in the U.S.  The new 2013 Best Lawyers, which is the 19th edition, is based on a rigorous national survey involving nearly 4 million evaluations of lawyers by other lawyers.  Since it was first published in 1983, Best Lawyers has become universally regarded as the definitive guide to legal excellence. Because Best Lawyers is based on an exhaustive peer-review survey in which more than 36,000 leading attorneys cast almost 4.4 million votes on the legal abilities of other lawyers in their practice areas, and because lawyers are not required or allowed to pay a fee to be listed, inclusion in Best Lawyers is considered a singular honor. Corporate Counsel magazine has called Best Lawyers “the most respected referral list of attorneys in practice.”

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If you are involved in a New Hampshire divorce or child custody matter, you may want to protect your Facebook and other social networking sites. A 2010 survey by the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers (AAML) found that four out of five lawyers reported an increasing number of divorce cases citing evidence taken from social networking sites, with Facebook being the leader. According to the AAML, an overwhelming 81% of the nation’s top divorce attorneys say they have seen an increase in the number of cases using social networking evidence over the past five years.

Is your information really private?facebook-privacy

Although you may believe access to your social networking posts is limited to your friends, those friends may not have the same level of protection, leaving the private aspects of your life open to scrutiny. Where you go, what you do and who you are with may all be used against you by your estranged spouse to gain an advantage in your NH Divorce. Photographs and posts from social networking sites, including those posted by friends on their own pages, may become evidence in your New Hampshire divorce or child custody proceedings. Marlene Eskind Moses, president of the AAML, notes that the openness and sharing of social networking sites left their users’ public and private lives more exposed. The World Wide Web offers many wonderful opportunities but may also present pit-falls in your future legal needs.

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The New Hampshire Supreme Court may soon hear arguments concerning whether or not to provide legal counsel to poor parents who face civil family law cases, particularly those that involve parental rights and responsibilities, abuse, and neglect issues, according to a recent article in the Boston Globe. New Hampshire and Mississippi are currently the only states that do not provide a parent an attorney in these cases if the parent cannot afford one.

Until recently, New Hampshire did provide attorneys for indigent parents facing certain family law battles involving children. However, funding for this program was cut in the previous legislative session, leaving many parents without representation just when they may need it most – when their relationship with their children is at stake.

Because the stakes in a child abuse and neglect case are so high, New Hampshire Legal Assistance recently filed suit, seeking to get the program reinstated so that parents will still have access to the help of an attorney. Opponents, however, say that creating a right to counsel in civil cases will create a “slippery slope” that will cost the state a great deal of money.

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A bill currently working its way through the New Hampshire legislature would give each parent an equal share of custody in most divorce cases, according to a recent article posted by Seacoast Online.

The bill, known as HB 591, would require courts to begin with the presumption that child custody in NH should be shared equally between two parents. However, courts may make different arrangements if one parent does not want custody or if situations in a parent’s home, such as abuse or neglect, mean that spending equal time with that parent would not be in the child’s best interest. In most situations, however, parents would be expected to work out a fifty-fifty child-custody-sharing arrangement, or follow the arrangement set up by the court if they cannot come to an agreement themselves.

Supporters of the bill also point out that it will save divorcing couples and taxpayers time and money, since receiving equal custody will prevent many parents from feeling the need to fight for such an arrangement in court. Currently, judges have great discretion to arrange custody according to the best interests of the children, especially if the parents cannot agree on an arrangement.

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Many couples in New Hampshire and other states are “cohabiting,” or living together, and even raising children without getting legally married. Although the arrangement suits many couples who use it, it may not protect either the adults or the children in the family if the cohabitation relationship splits up.

Only nine U.S. states currently recognize “common-law marriage,” in which a couple lives together and holds themselves out as married, but never gets a formal marriage certificate. New Hampshire is not one of these states, but courts in New Hampshire will consider cohabitation in the limited instance of probate disputes – issues regarding who should receive a deceased person’s estate after he or she has died.cohabitation

However, in New Hampshire and most other U.S. states, cohabiting doesn’t provide the same protections as marriage. Legal protections related to child custody, visitation, spousal and NH child support, and the rights to see one another in the hospital or make important decisions on a partner’s behalf are missing if a couple is not legally married, even if they are devoted to one another and have been together for many years. Some foreign countries also prohibit travel or staying together by couples who are not married.

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Each U.S. state has its own procedure for divorce, and New Hampshire is no exception. Some states’ divorce processes require waiting periods, counseling, separation periods, and other steps that can add months or even years before a divorce is final. Others offer a relatively streamlined process, without requiring the couple be married or separated for a certain time period.

Compared to other U.S. states, New Hampshire has one of the“easier” divorce processes, according to Bloomberg. That is, a divorce in New Hampshire has fewer built-in waiting periods to extend the process, making it possible to finalize a divorce much more quickly here than in some other states. This is especially true if the couple has no children and seeks a no-fault divorce.

For instance, in Arkansas, the parties must first live apart for at least 540 days, or about one and a half years, before the divorce can be finalized. Add the state’s 60-day residency requirement and the 30-day required period between filing and finalization, and a divorce in Arkansas can take nearly two full years from start to finish. By contrast, New Hampshire has no minimum separation, residency, or waiting period, so a divorce in this state can be finished in whatever amount of time the parties need to work out an agreement in regards to such matters as marital property.